CBD News https://cannabidiolcbd.org Sun, 19 May 2019 04:25:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2 Johnston County woman charged with having marijuana says it was CBD – WNCT https://cannabidiolcbd.org/johnston-county-woman-charged-with-having-marijuana-says-it-was-cbd-wnct/ Sun, 19 May 2019 04:25:50 +0000 http://CBMid2h0dHBzOi8vd3d3LnduY3QuY29tL25ld3Mvbm9ydGgtY2Fyb2xpbmEvam9obnN0b24tY291bnR5LXdvbWFuLWNoYXJnZWQtd2l0aC1oYXZpbmctbWFyaWp1YW5hLXNheXMtaXQtd2FzLWNiZC8yMDA4NjM0MzQ40gEA FOUR OAKS, N.C. (WNCN) – CBD oil – which looks and smells like marijuana, but doesn’t get you high – is legal in North Carolina, and many people use it as alternative medicine. But, many law enforcement officers don’t have the tools to tell the difference between legal CBD and […]

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FOUR OAKS, N.C. (WNCN) – CBD oil – which looks and smells like marijuana, but doesn’t get you high – is legal in North Carolina, and many people use it as alternative medicine. But, many law enforcement officers don’t have the tools to tell the difference between legal CBD and marijuana.

In February, a Four Oaks mom was seriously injured in a car crash.

Amanda Furstonberg, desperate for relief from pain and turned to CBD.

“It helped me tremendously,” said Furstonberg. “I barely took the pain pills that they were prescribing me. It helped me sleep. It helped with the PTSD, the anxiety. I couldn’t function correctly and the hemp flower and the CBD helped.”

Furstonberg says the CBD worked so well she eventually ditched her prescription pills all together.

Everything was going fine until April when the police showed up at her home.   

“The cops literally came to the window and said, ‘Where’s the weed?’ And I said, ‘I don’t have weed I have CBD.’ They said, ‘We don’t believe you, so either we’re going to come in or we’re going to get a warrant and it’s going to be worse on you.”

Furstonberg says she allowed the police inside. She tried to tell them what she was smoking wasn’t marijuana at all.

She says she even showed them the CBD packaging.

“They did not believe that,” she said. “They told me I could print it off the internet and that I was lying and that he was trained and that it was marijuana.”

Furstonberg was charged with a schedule one misdemeanor for possession of marijuana.

“I’m not coming down on law enforcement,” said John Fanny, a Raleigh criminal defense lawyer. “They are in a tough position. Marijuana is illegal, so they’re tasked with enforcing those laws they see someone like Amanda who has something that looks and smells like marijuana, what do they do? The only way to deal with that effectively for them is education, maybe a change in policy and ultimately a change in the law.”

Furstonberg’s case is the third case like this Fanny has handled. In one case he was able to get his client off by bringing the CBD products to the district attorney.

“Look at this, how can you distinguish the difference between marijuana and not marijuana? They looked at the packaging, talked with us for a few minutes and then they dismissed the case,” Fanny said.

Garner police say they haven’t run into any cases like this yet, but they did admit they don’t have the capability to tell the difference between the two.

They say the tests they have now only test to see if there is any THC in the product.

CBD can contain THC, but less than 0.3%.

“The only way to absolutely tell the difference between a CBD flower and a THC flower is to send it off to a lab and to have a fairly expensive test done to determine the amount of THC that is in the product,” Fanny said. “It can be done, but it’s very expensive, it’s time-consuming and it uses a lot of state resources.”

CBS 17 also reached out to Four Oaks police, but so far have not heard back.

Fanny says he will take on Furstonberg’s case.

She has a court date in June.

Fanny is hopeful he’ll be able to get the charges dropped. His best advice to people who do smoke CBD, keep it in its original packaging and be careful where you use it. 

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Source: https://www.wnct.com/news/north-carolina/johnston-county-woman-charged-with-having-marijuana-says-it-was-cbd/2008634348

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Florida Parents Lose Custody Of Toddler In CBD Vs. Chemo Battle – CBD Testers https://cannabidiolcbd.org/florida-parents-lose-custody-of-toddler-in-cbd-vs-chemo-battle-cbd-testers/ Sun, 19 May 2019 03:26:10 +0000 http://CBMiOmh0dHBzOi8vY2JkdGVzdGVycy5jby8yMDE5LzA1LzE3L3BhcmVudHMtbG9zZS1jdXN0b2R5LWNiZC_SAT5odHRwczovL2NiZHRlc3RlcnMuY28vMjAxOS8wNS8xNy9wYXJlbnRzLWxvc2UtY3VzdG9keS1jYmQvYW1wLw When doctors told one Florida couple that chemo was the only way to save their toddler’s life, they had no idea that refusing could have such dire consequences. When 3-year-old Noah was diagnosed with cancer in his blood and bone marrow in April, his parents were understandably distraught. Doctors told […]

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When doctors told one Florida couple that chemo was the only way to save their toddler’s life, they had no idea that refusing could have such dire consequences.

When 3-year-old Noah was diagnosed with cancer in his blood and bone marrow in April, his parents were understandably distraught. Doctors told Joshua McAdams and Taylor Bland-Ball that chemo was the only way to save the toddler’s life, but they opposed the treatment.

While the couple was in court this week to resist the state’s insistence that the boy undergo chemo, they said they would instead give little Noah CBD, despite being threatened with loss of custody. CBD is the non-psychoactive compound in cannabis, which is considered by some to have medicinal qualities and potential anti-cancer properties.

According to a News10 report, Noah was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He underwent two rounds of chemo which left him weak and lifeless. His parents took the step of giving him CBD, vitamins, and put him on a strict diet. Taylor told reporters, “We just want one of the therapies less drastic than chemotherapy. I want my son home and for him to be treated with a treatment that is not going to damage his little body so much,” she said.

When Noah’s parents could no longer watch their son suffer from chemotherapy and failed to show for the third round of treatment, the Department of Children and Families (DCF) got involved and issued an endangered child alert.

The family had fled and was found in a motel room in Georgetown, Kentucky. When they were returned to Florida, temporary custody of Noah was granted to his maternal grandparents. 

The DCF appealed to the court to try and force Noah to undergo the treatment recommended by his specialists and was successful with their motions. At the hearing, the family’s attorney, Michael Minardi, told Circuit Judge Caroline Tesche Arkin that he needed more time to prepare his case and for a postponement of the case.

That request was promptly declined, and the courtroom cleared out. The state’s attorney, Nancy Lawler felt Noah’s privacy was at stake, and she didn’t want to sway the case in any way.

However, Noah’s parents explained that they wished for the press to remain in the courtroom so the public could be informed about the proceedings. “This is another attempt by (the state) and the guardian ad litem to thwart justice, to thwart this child’s ability to have his voice heard,” Minardi said.

The media was removed from the court by the judge, and the hearing was closed to the public. The hearing was also recessed until next week. Minardi explained further that Noah’s parents have already applied for a medical cannabis license for him.

Doctors from Florida are also set to appear in court when the hearing takes place to testify to the potential positive medicinal effects of cannabis for treating cancer and its symptoms. Minardi said the family hopes these medical experts will “get this court to realize that that is a far superior treatment to chemotherapy at this point in time.”

Unfortunately, it appears the statistics are against Noah at the moment. According to a Tampa Bay Times report, Dr. Bijal D. Shah, the head of the Moffitt Cancer Center’s acute lymphoblastic leukemia program, said the cure rate for this type of cancer is 90 percent with chemo for a period of 2.5 years. That means the state could remove Noah from his parents’ custody and force him to go through years of chemotherapy, instead of the CBD treatments they chose for him.

It remains to be seen what the outcome of Noah’s case will be. But it certainly raises some vital, albeit painful, questions about standard medical treatments as opposed to unconventional alternatives. It also highlights the very real possibility that parents may lose custody of their children should they opt for more natural remedies like CBD. 

Please note, we are NOT suggesting that anyone forgo important medical care and use cannabis products instead. If you are suffering from a serious medical condition, make sure to speak with your healthcare provider before making any changes to your treatment plan. 

For more stories like this, make sure to subscribe to our Weekly Newsletter, the top source for all things cannabis-related. 

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2019/05/17/parents-lose-custody-cbd/

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Could Hemp Join Tobacco As Top Virginia Cash Crop? – Patch.com https://cannabidiolcbd.org/could-hemp-join-tobacco-as-top-virginia-cash-crop-patch-com/ Sun, 19 May 2019 03:26:08 +0000 http://CBMiU2h0dHBzOi8vcGF0Y2guY29tL3ZpcmdpbmlhL2Fjcm9zcy12YS9jb3VsZC1oZW1wLWpvaW4tdG9iYWNjby10b3AtdmlyZ2luaWEtY2FzaC1jcm9w0gFgaHR0cHM6Ly9wYXRjaC5jb20vdmlyZ2luaWEvYWNyb3NzLXZhL2FtcC8yODA4MzEyMS9jb3VsZC1oZW1wLWpvaW4tdG9iYWNjby10b3AtdmlyZ2luaWEtY2FzaC1jcm9w By Daniel Berti and Andrew Gionfriddo, Capital News Service JARRATT, VA — At first glance, it looks like a stoner’s paradise: Acres of plants that resemble marijuana. But this crop is hemp, a relative of cannabis that has commercial uses ranging from textiles and animal feed to health products. Officials […]

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By Daniel Berti and Andrew Gionfriddo, Capital News Service

JARRATT, VA — At first glance, it looks like a stoner’s paradise: Acres of plants that resemble marijuana. But this crop is hemp, a relative of cannabis that has commercial uses ranging from textiles and animal feed to health products.

Officials at the Southern Virginia Hemp Co., as well as other farmers and processors of the plant, say hemp could be a big boost to the state’s agricultural sector as demand for tobacco wanes. And it is now much easier to grow hemp in the Commonwealth.

Lawmakers have amended the state’s hemp laws to match the rules in the 2018 federal farm bill passed by Congress. Virginia farmers can now grow hemp for producing cannabidiol, or CBD, a naturally occurring chemical that some say has mental and physical health benefits.

CBD products have become popular over the past few years, with some industry analysts predicting the CBD industry will be worth $22 billion by 2022. Until now, only researchers at Virginia universities could grow hemp for making CBD.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has seen a surge in grower and processor applications since Congress passed the farm bill in December. The agency expects the number of applicants to increase even more now that Virginia has amended its hemp laws to match the federal laws.

“VDACS was not issuing registrations to processor applicants who indicated that their sole goal was to sell a hemp-derived CBD to the public,” said Erin Williams, a spokesperson for the agency. “With the 2019 amendment, I think it will clear up the gray area.”

As of Tuesday, the department had issued 629 grower registrations and 92 processor registrations. So far, Virginia hemp growers are planning to cultivate over 2,000 acres of hemp this year.

In Southside Virginia, where tobacco growers have been hit hard by declining sales and tariffs on their products, farmers are increasingly turning to hemp as a potential cash crop that can be grown in addition to tobacco. Southside Virginia has more registered hemp growers than any other region in the state.

“There’s significant interest in Southside Virginia, particularly among tobacco growers who are looking to add a crop to what they’re doing,” Williams said.

For years, several other states have allowed farmers to grow hemp for the manufacture of CBD products. But Virginia farmers were barred from doing so until lawmakers approved House Bill 1839 in February.

Gov. Ralph Northam signed the bill into law on March 21. Thanks to an emergency clause, it took effect immediately.

The legislation comes on the heels of the 2018 federal farm bill, which established a regulatory framework for the commercial production of hemp. HB 1839 conforms Virginia’s hemp laws to match the provisions of the federal bill.

The Southern Virginia Hemp Co., a farm in the town of Jarratt straddling Greenville and Sussex counties, is expanding its operations to meet the demand for CBD products. The company plans to grow between 75 and 150 acres of hemp this year and aims to hire 40 additional employees to work on the farm this summer.

Wayne Grizzard, owner of the Southern Virginia Hemp Co. and Virginia Homegrown Botanicals, said the new laws could have a positive impact for farmers across the commonwealth, especially for tobacco farmers who have been hit hard by tobacco tariffs levied against the United States by China.

“One of my partner’s farms was for tobacco. He lost all three contracts this year because of the tariffs,” Grizzard said. “Some of the farmers have been forced to grow hemp because they don’t have anything to replace it.”

Since colonial times, Virginia farmers — even George Washington — have planted hemp, using the fiber to make rope and other goods. Historian estimate that by the mid-18th century, Virginia had 12,000 acres cultivated for hemp. Marijuana and hemp were both banned in the 1930s under the Marihuana Tax Act, however. (And yes, that is how the law spelled marijuana.)

Now, Grizzard, once a vegetable farmer, has converted his entire farm to hemp.

“When we first started growing, everybody kind of turned their nose up because it’s cannabis,” Grizzard said. “Once they started realizing that everybody’s getting into it and there’s money involved, they started singing a different tune.”

Until now, Virginia’s hemp industry has failed to keep pace with neighboring Kentucky and North Carolina. Both states have been eyeing hemp as an economic driver for several years.

In 2019, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture approved 1,035 applications to cultivate up to 42,086 acres of industrial hemp, as well as 2.9 million square feet of greenhouse space for hemp cultivation.

North Carolina has 634 licensed farmers growing hemp on about 8,000 acres and 3.4 million square feet of greenhouse space.

Grizzard said the next step for hemp in Virginia is still up in the air. He said the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services must submit a plan to the U.S. Department of Agriculture “because the USDA has taken over all states’ hemp programs.”

“As long we’re there to fight, battle and voice our opinions as farmers and business owners, we need to stick together and figure out what we need,” he said.

Grizzard and other farmers are concerned about regulations that could stifle their production and overall business model.

“They could come up with some crazy laws that go against everything we’re doing,” he said. “You never know — there’s always that chance.”

One of the Southern Virginia Hemp Co.’s most popular products is hemp extract oil — cannabidiol. CBD by itself does not cause a “high,” but it has gained popularity as a treatment for a wide range of ailments.

According to Peter Grinspoon, contributing editor of Harvard Health Publishing, CBD has been used to treat chronic pain, as well as some diseases that more familiar medicines have failed to help or significantly alleviate.

“CBD has been touted for a wide variety of health issues, but the strongest scientific evidence is for its effectiveness in treating some of the cruelest childhood epilepsy syndromes, such as Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome,” Grinspoon wrote in a blog post last year.

“CBD is commonly used to address anxiety, and for patients who suffer through the misery of insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both falling asleep and staying asleep.”

As Grinspoon notes, a lot of the support for CBD comes from testimonials and anecdotal evidence. There has been a lack of formal medical research because CBD supplements are not approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration.

CDB is the second most active ingredient in cannabis after tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the principal psychoactive constituent. Hemp also contains a small amount of THC — but not enough to produce a “high.”

Marketing CBD could just be scratching the surface in regard to medicinal components of the hemp plant.

Now that derivatives of hemp are legal, other cannabinoids besides CBD can be extracted from the plant as long they remain below the 0.3 percent THC threshold, Grizzard said. These other chemical extracts include cannabigerol, cannabinol and cannabichromene.

“Every single plant we grow has a different profile. They all have different cannabinoids in them,” Grizzard said.

“Some of them are higher in CBD; some have high CBG, CBN, CBC. There are a lot of different chemicals in that plant. There’s a lot of unknown of what these chemicals do for people.”

The Southern Virginia Hemp Co. hopes to find whether different cannabinoids help with specific ailments. Whether a flash in the pan or the sign of a new wave of medicine, CBD and hemp products have gained popularity over the past couple of years.

“It’s the doctors, the pharmacists, the physical therapists — they’re giving recommendations to people to take this stuff,” Grizzard said. “It’s not me.”

Source: https://patch.com/virginia/across-va/could-hemp-join-tobacco-top-virginia-cash-crop

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Grandmother arrested for having CBD Oil to file lawsuit against theme park – WCNC.com https://cannabidiolcbd.org/grandmother-arrested-for-having-cbd-oil-to-file-lawsuit-against-theme-park-wcnc-com/ Sun, 19 May 2019 03:25:57 +0000 http://CBMimQFodHRwczovL3d3dy53Y25jLmNvbS92aWRlby9uZXdzL2xvY2FsL2dyYW5kbW90aGVyLWFycmVzdGVkLWZvci1oYXZpbmctY2JkLW9pbC10by1maWxlLWxhd3N1aXQtYWdhaW5zdC10aGVtZS1wYXJrLzI3NS03ZjQ3OGRhYS04NjdkLTRhMTItOGZlMi01MTM0OGI0NGE0NmPSAQA She says her doctor recommended CBD Oil to help with her arthritis in North Carolina, where CBD products continue to exist in a gray area. But in Florida, possessing CBD is a felony. Published: 11:32 PM EDT May 14, 2019 Updated: 11:31 PM EDT May 14, 2019 Source: https://www.wcnc.com/video/news/local/grandmother-arrested-for-having-cbd-oil-to-file-lawsuit-against-theme-park/275-7f478daa-867d-4a12-8fe2-51348b44a46c » […]

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She says her doctor recommended CBD Oil to help with her arthritis in North Carolina, where CBD products continue to exist in a gray area. But in Florida, possessing CBD is a felony.

Published: 11:32 PM EDT May 14, 2019

Updated: 11:31 PM EDT May 14, 2019

Source: https://www.wcnc.com/video/news/local/grandmother-arrested-for-having-cbd-oil-to-file-lawsuit-against-theme-park/275-7f478daa-867d-4a12-8fe2-51348b44a46c

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How CBD Can Help Hepatitis C – FactsAboutCBD https://cannabidiolcbd.org/how-cbd-can-help-hepatitis-c-factsaboutcbd/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:55:32 +0000 http://CBMiQGh0dHBzOi8vZmFjdHNhYm91dGNiZC5vcmcvaG93LWNiZC1jYW4taGVscC1oZXBhdGl0aXMtYy0yNjI1Lmh0bWzSAQA Did you know that scientists aren’t even sure how many people are affected by sickle cell anemia in the world right now? Most people don’t realize that one of the most frequently identified hereditary conditions is in fact sickle cell anemia. While we don’t know exactly how many people suffer […]

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Did you know that scientists aren’t even sure how many people are affected by sickle cell anemia in the world right now? Most people don’t realize that one of the most frequently identified hereditary conditions is in fact sickle cell anemia.

While we don’t know exactly how many people suffer from this difficult condition, we do know that it’s at least millions. Those living in Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean countries, Africa, and India are most at risk.

Coming to Grips with Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle cell anemia is a common version of the sickle cell disease, as you might guess. The most important and peculiar characteristic that defines this disease is a crescent shape found in red blood cells.

A red blood cell isn’t supposed to be crescent-shaped. Instead, it supposed to be round and flattish, allowing transportation through membranes with tight gaps, which are common throughout the body’s circulatory system.

It is this crescent-shaped or sickle shaped character as well as a rigidity that is responsible for all of the problems that go along with sickle cell disease.

What Causes Sickle Cell Disease?

The cause of sickle cell disease is a gene mutation. Specifically, it is the gene that responsible for hemoglobin production.

Hemoglobin, an important protein found in red blood cells, attaches itself to oxygen molecules to help transport them around the body.

The mutation that causes sickle cell disease is a mutation involved in the production of the shape of red blood cells, resulting in the misshapen, rigid, sickle shaped design that is responsible for the problems that come with this difficult condition.

At the end of the day, the problem that is found with this condition is that of factors involved in causing a difficulty adjusting when the weather is cold, some occasional bouts of dizziness, and a lack of energy.

Diagnosis is actually extremely easy, and most cases of the disease are already detected by the time the baby is born. That said, to know for sure, a doctor will prescribe a blood test diagnosis that will determine precisely whether or not the patient carries the sickle cell abnormality and thus will suffer from effects associated with the disease.

A Solution and a Problem

If you understand more about sickle cell disease, it may not be too surprising to know that case density is greatest in areas where prevalence of malaria is to be found.

You see, the odd shape of red blood cells for individuals with sickle cell disease actually works to repel the spread of malaria throughout the body. Hence, over an even illusionary timeline, sickle cell disease has actually evolved as a defense in areas where malaria is particularly common in individuals are likely to be exposed to it.

In such places, having sickle cell disease actually decreases one’s chances of death, thereby increasing one’s chances of survival and eventual reproduction. This is why the disease has gained traction in certain areas of the world.

How Can CBD Help?

While there are no absolute treatments for sickle cell disease, cannabis and CBD have appeared to make a positive difference in both coping and managing the process that one must endure as a sufferer of sickle cell anemia.

CBD works to aid in the functionality of the immune system as well is the nervous system, thus treating many of the symptoms that are most often experienced by those with this terrible disease.

Source: https://factsaboutcbd.org/how-cbd-can-help-hepatitis-c-2625.html

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Birmingham Southside’s first “CBD only” store now open next to Zydeco in Five Points South – Bham Now https://cannabidiolcbd.org/birmingham-southsides-first-cbd-only-store-now-open-next-to-zydeco-in-five-points-south-bham-now/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:35:47 +0000 http://CAIiEOmGlYxhqNNzNiVl2BeQYB0qGQgEKhAIACoHCAowmYCHCzD-nIUDMNOblgY Near to Me CBD’s John Parker and Jessica Hunter. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now The first CBD exclusive store within the city limits of Birmingham opened its doors on May 7, in the Five Points Neighborhood near Zydeco. Near to Me Billboard CBD Store directing customers. Photo by […]

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Owners of Near to Me CBD Birmingham

Near to Me CBD’s John Parker and Jessica Hunter. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

The first CBD exclusive store within the city limits of Birmingham opened its doors on May 7, in the Five Points Neighborhood near Zydeco.

Near to Me CBD billboard

Near to Me Billboard CBD Store directing customers. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Near to me CBD is holding a soft opening this week, according to John Parker its Managing Partner.

The store is selling CBD vapes, lotions, salves, skincare items and pet products. They also feature a line of products from Relyf, the Birmingham -based premium CBD company and MedTerra whose products are being sold at participating  CVS Pharmacy stores in seven states outside of Alabama.

Law Clarified

For folks unfamiliar with CBD or Cannabidiol,  the product claims to have many benefits including relieving pain (See Bham Now story on UAB’s research). Derived from the cannabis plant, CBD is not the same as marijuana and the products do not contain the psychoactive component THC.

Last year, the U.S. Congress clarified the law concerning the sale of CBD products nationwide through amendments in the  2018 Farm Bill that passed in December and was signed into law by President Trump.

Soon after the law passed, Alabama Attorney General Marshall issued a memo confirming the legality of CBD stores.

“Our motivation is to help people in our community and educate people about industrial hemp and how it benefits the human body and your pets,” said Parker. “We have high quality third party tested CBD products that are affordable.”

Alternative to Prescriptions

CBD Products at Near to Me Birmingham

Line of Near to Me products at Near to Me CBD Store in Birmingham

Jessica Hunter, Near to Me CBD’s Creative Director added:

“We want to to bring forth natural products. In this day in age, with the opiod crisis being such an issue –  CBD provides a healthier alternative to prescription drugs.”

She also stressed that they want to help people with their pain management and wellness needs.

“CBD is  a natural option,” said Hunter.

Location and Hours

Storefront Near to Me CBD

CBD Storefront near Zydeco’s. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Near to Me CBD is located at 2009 15th Ave. South, Birmingham, 35205 in the old Roly Poly establishment adjacent to Zydeco’s.  There is plenty of parking and the store will be open Monday through Friday 10:00AM-7:00PM and Saturday Noon to 7:00PM. They will be closed on Sunday.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama’s Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama’s cancer risk and mercury standards.

Source: https://bhamnow.com/2019/05/08/birmingham-southsides-first-cbd-only-store-now-open-next-to-zydeco-in-five-points-south/

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CBD bath bombs add extra punch to tub, expert says – KOCO Oklahoma City https://cannabidiolcbd.org/cbd-bath-bombs-add-extra-punch-to-tub-expert-says-koco-oklahoma-city/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:35:41 +0000 http://CAIiEJa57DXIcGucKdk-MN98diIqGAgEKg8IACoHCAow3sn-ATCKkRcw0LWYBg A hot bath is always relaxing, but now some are adding an extra punch to the tub — cannabidiol.An expert said adding CBD, which comes in a package that looks like a regular bath bomb, has several benefits.”We take the time to take a bath, throw a bath bomb in. […]

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A hot bath is always relaxing, but now some are adding an extra punch to the tub — cannabidiol.An expert said adding CBD, which comes in a package that looks like a regular bath bomb, has several benefits.”We take the time to take a bath, throw a bath bomb in. Imagine that amplified with CBD,” said Emmanuel Rivera, with American Shaman CBD in The Village.Bath bombs loaded with CBD are flying off local shelves.”A lot of women love bath bombs in general,” Rivera said. “So, when they hear they can maybe amplify the benefits they get from the regular bath bomb, they come in and ask for them.”Some people wonder if the CBD bath bombs smell like grass.”It’s essential oil base. Whether it’s lavender or eucalyptus, you’re not gonna smell like grass or the cannabis plant,” Rivera said.But can people get high from a CBD bath?”You do not get high,” Rivera said. “As far as calmness, maybe some anxiety relief. You’re gonna get some soreness outta here.”Rivera tested the CBD bath bomb for himself before American Shaman CBD started selling the product.”I was very sore on my back. I got in the bath with the CBD bomb, I got out and I had no more aches,” he said.CBD bath bombs are a little more expensive than regular bath bombs or bubble bath. One CBD bath bomb costs $20 but can be split in half for two baths.

A hot bath is always relaxing, but now some are adding an extra punch to the tub — cannabidiol.

An expert said adding CBD, which comes in a package that looks like a regular bath bomb, has several benefits.

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“We take the time to take a bath, throw a bath bomb in. Imagine that amplified with CBD,” said Emmanuel Rivera, with American Shaman CBD in The Village.

Bath bombs loaded with CBD are flying off local shelves.

“A lot of women love bath bombs in general,” Rivera said. “So, when they hear they can maybe amplify the benefits they get from the regular bath bomb, they come in and ask for them.”

Some people wonder if the CBD bath bombs smell like grass.

“It’s essential oil base. Whether it’s lavender or eucalyptus, you’re not gonna smell like grass or the cannabis plant,” Rivera said.

But can people get high from a CBD bath?

“You do not get high,” Rivera said. “As far as calmness, maybe some anxiety relief. You’re gonna get some soreness outta here.”

Rivera tested the CBD bath bomb for himself before American Shaman CBD started selling the product.

“I was very sore on my back. I got in the bath with the CBD bomb, I got out and I had no more aches,” he said.

CBD bath bombs are a little more expensive than regular bath bombs or bubble bath. One CBD bath bomb costs $20 but can be split in half for two baths.

AlertMe

Source: https://www.koco.com/article/cbd-bath-bombs-add-extra-punch-to-tub-expert-says/27460385

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Bob’s Pharmacy Stocks Its Shelves With CBD Oil – Pharmacy Times https://cannabidiolcbd.org/bobs-pharmacy-stocks-its-shelves-with-cbd-oil-pharmacy-times/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:26:00 +0000 http://CBMia2h0dHBzOi8vd3d3LnBoYXJtYWN5dGltZXMuY29tL3B1YmxpY2F0aW9ucy9pc3N1ZS8yMDE5L21heTIwMTkvYm9icy1waGFybWFjeS1zdG9ja3MtaXRzLXNoZWx2ZXMtd2l0aC1jYmQtb2ls0gEA Editor’s note: The characters in this article are a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events, locales, and incidents either are the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental. The agriculture […]

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Editor’s note: The characters in this article are a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events, locales, and incidents either are the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

The agriculture improvement act of 2018 legalized industrial hemp under federal law after hemp and its derivative products were removed from the Drug Enforcement Administration’s schedule I list of controlled substances. The law also reclassified hemp as an industrial plant, permitting its commercial cultivation and use.

Bob, a congenial and conscientious neighborhood pharmacist, is the proprietor of Bob’s Pharmacy in Small Town, USA, which he operates with his wife, Sally, who is also a pharmacist. Their good advice over the years has won their customers’ trust and earned them a solid reputation.

A man in his mid-30s, wearing a conservative suit, enters the pharmacy. Sally recognizes him as Joe, an occasional customer. He is usually cheerful, but today he appears uncertain and worried.

“Do you have hemp CBD oil?” Joe asks Sally, who is behind the counter.

“I think so,” replies Sally, who turns and calls into the back room, “Hey, Bob. Did we get that delivery today?”

“Yep,” he answers. Joe explains that his daughter, Hayden, is having recurring epileptic seizures. Many have been brief, with just a half-minute of her staring into space, but other episodes have been more severe, with his daughter collapsing and sometimes hurting herself. Bob, emerging from the back room, joins the conversation.

“Did you get a helmet for her?” he asks.

“Had to,” Joe answers. “She was bruising her head when she fell.”

Joe says that Hayden was hospitalized several times. He took her to different doctors, who prescribed various medications, but she began to experience numerous adverse effects.

“Can hemp oil help her?” Joe asks.

HEMP: ROPE, NOT DOPE
Cannabis is a family of plants. Hemp and marijuana are 2 different species of the plant within that genus (Cannabis sativa L). One of the major components derived from hemp is cannabidiol (CBD), and it does not produce a high. The tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in marijuana, rather, produces a psychoactive effect. CBD has proven antiseizure benefits, among others. It can induce analgesic, antianxiety, anticonvulsive, anti-inflammatory, and anti–muscle spasm effects.

Marijuana refers to the psychotropic drug that is the subject of much current legal debate. It is a schedule  I drug and illegal under federal law. However, many states have allowed the possession and use of marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes.

HEMPSEED OIL VERSUS HEMP CBD OIL
Hempseed oil is extracted by cold-pressing hemp seeds. The oil is a good source of protein and counteracts aging, has omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and promotes cardiovascular health. Hemp CBD oil is produced from the flower of the plant. CBD, though it has limited federal FDA approval (eg, Epidiolex), is thought anecdotally to have treatment benefits in a variety of illnesses.

Hemp is available for ingestion both as a capsule and an oil. Joe purchased a tincture-size bottle and capsules. Hayden can ingest the oil in droplet form after mixing it with a vehicle or as an oral capsule.

CHALLENGES AND OBSTACLES
The Agricultural Improvement Act drastically reworked federal hemp policy, but legalization carries with it some remaining regulatory restrictions. Moreover, federal and state barriers to the sale of hemp products have not completely disappeared. First, the bill permits the sale of only those hemp products that have been specifically authorized by applicable laws. These products must be made from “industrial hemp,” and any cannabis plant that contains more than 0.3% will be considered marijuana, so it would have no legal protection under this new legislation.

Next, the FDA still considers hemp to be a drug and categorizes it as an illegal controlled substance. On the same day that the act was passed, the FDA issued a statement advising that despite hemp’s new legal status, the agency’s opinion on the matter had not changed. The FDA is the subject of severe criticism for taking this position, which is largely seen as an aggressive action to prevent hemp from being legally sold in drug outlets and the marketplace in general.

GUIDELINES FOR PHARMACIES
A pharmacy that handles hemp products must carefully review the definition of marijuana in its state to determine whether it excludes hemp and whether it lists THC as a controlled substance. Knowing whether hemp and its production quality are legal and legitimate should be a vital part of a pharmacy’s due diligence. Even though hemp is legal under federal law, some state boards of pharmacy have still not taken a position on hemp sales in pharmacies because of state laws that have not been modified to conform with the Agricultural Improvement Act. As a result, pharmacies should consult a legal adviser before stocking their shelves with hemp.

A month later, Joe returned to Bob’s Pharmacy and gave Bob and Sally a big hug. Joe told them that Hayden had experienced a sharp decline in the number of seizures during the past 4 weeks since she started taking hemp oil. The duration of her seizures had also decreased.

“Most of all, I’m grateful for being able to see my daughter grow, develop, and smile again,” Joe said.
 


Ned Milenkovich, PharmD, JD, is chairman of the health care law practice at Much Shelist PC in Chicago and former vice chairman of the Illinois State Board of Pharmacy.


Source: https://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/2019/may2019/bobs-pharmacy-stocks-its-shelves-with-cbd-oil

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As prevalence of medical marijuana increases, doctors and providers focus on educating users – Valley News https://cannabidiolcbd.org/as-prevalence-of-medical-marijuana-increases-doctors-and-providers-focus-on-educating-users-valley-news/ Sun, 19 May 2019 02:04:15 +0000 http://CBMidWh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LnZuZXdzLmNvbS9FdmlkZW5jZS1MaW1pdGVkLWZvci1IZWFsdGgtQ2FyZS1Qcm92aWRlcnMtU2Vla2luZy10by1Db3Vuc2VsLVBhdGllbnRzLWluLUNhbm5hYmlzLVVzZS0yNTQ0Nzg1NdIBAA Although medical marijuana has been legal in the Twin States for several years, physicians and other medical providers are still figuring out how best to counsel patients who are using cannabis products to treat a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from anxiety to chronic pain. And the questions from patients […]

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Although medical marijuana has been legal in the Twin States for several years, physicians and other medical providers are still figuring out how best to counsel patients who are using cannabis products to treat a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from anxiety to chronic pain.

And the questions from patients are increasing as CBD — shorthand for cannabidiol, a substance derived from cannabis for medicinal treatment — can be readily found on store shelves and online, and as recreational marijuana use was recently legalized in Vermont. But because marijuana is a Schedule I substance at the federal level, it has no currently accepted medical use, and the Federal Drug Administration has not approved it for use under medical supervision.

Medical providers in both Vermont and New Hampshire are left to answer patients’ questions about cannabis products without guidance from the FDA. They also are doing so in an ever-changing market and regulatory environment.

This dearth of information means people like Patricia Eames, who sells CBD products at her Clover Gift Shop in Woodstock, are fielding phone calls from people seeking advice about the various forms of CBD — which include oils, gummies, salves, creams and drinks — as well as how much to take and when to take it.

“I think it would be helpful for doctors to at least learn a little bit about it,” said Eames, who takes CBD to help manage her anxiety.

Though people frequently ask her how to use CBD, Eames said she cannot provide that advice. Instead, people have to try the products to find out what works or doesn’t work for them, she said.

“I’m not a doctor,” she said. “I’m not a nurse. I’m a gift shop owner with an interest in CBD.”

Because patients are using cannabis and its derivatives as medicine and recreationally, providers from the academic medical centers in both states are seeking to help other providers understand what is and isn’t known about cannabis, its risks and its medicinal uses.

In a grand rounds presentation at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon in January, “Cannabis and Opioids in Pain Management: Alternatives? Complements? Pipe Dream?,” Kathleen Broglio, a palliative care nurse practitioner, and Dr. Seddon Savage, who specializes in anesthesiology and pain medicine, provided clinicians with an overview of what is known and not yet known about how cannabis can be used to help manage pain.

Similarly in response to demand from providers, the Vermont Academic Detailing Program is launching a session on cannabinoids this summer. The academic detailing program, based at the University of Vermont, brings physicians and pharmacists to primary care practices throughout the state for small group sessions to discuss the state of the science on various topics. Though still under development, this session will include information about medical marijuana and CBD, and cover the risks and benefits of various options.

Though more research is needed to better understand how chemicals — including THC, which has psychotropic effects, and CBD, which does not — from cannabis plants might be used for medicine and what the risks of that use might be, the current state of the evidence, as outlined in a 2017 report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, indicate that cannabis products can be helpful with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, chronic pain and multiple sclerosis-related spasticity, which is feelings of stiffness and involuntary muscle spasms.

“For these conditions, the effects of cannabinoids are modest; for all other conditions evaluated, there is inadequate information to assess their effects,” the report said.

Negative effects of smoking cannabis include chronic cough and phlegm production, according to the National Academies report.

Smoking cannabis during pregnancy is linked to lower birth weight babies and may contribute to an increased cancer risk for children of women who smoke marijuana while pregnant, according to the report. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that pregnant women avoid cannabis during pregnancy.

In addition, frequent cannabis use can increase the risk of developing a substance use disorder, the report said. Cannabis use affects people’s ability to operate motor vehicles and can cause memory impairment for the 24 hours following use. It can increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychoses, and it may worsen the symptoms of bipolar disorder. It may be associated with one type of testicular cancer.

Given what limited information is available about benefits, risks and proper dosing, Broglio said in a recent phone interview that she first works with her patients to find drugs that have been approved by the FDA.

But sometimes that fails, Broglio said, pointing to examples such as patients struggling with cancer-related anorexia. In those cases, Broglio counsels patients who ask about medical marijuana and have the money to try it — which can run up to $500 per month — to be very clear with the people at the dispensary about which symptoms they are trying to treat.

In both states, medical providers do not prescribe medical marijuana. Instead, they sign off saying that a patient has a condition that qualifies them to carry a card allowing them to purchase marijuana from a licensed dispensary. When patients come to her asking about medical marijuana, Broglio said she feels it is her responsibility to counsel them in how to describe their symptoms to dispensary operators so they have the best chance of finding a suitable product.

She guides her patients through safe use strategies, and warns them not to drive while using medical marijuana, or to share it with others, especially children. Sharing medical marijuana with others is illegal.

She urges her patients to avoid edibles — food or candy made with marijuana — because they’re slower to take effect and may cause patients to take more than intended.

She counsels them not to purchase marijuana on the black market because it can be difficult to know the source and may be laced with other drugs, including methamphetamine.

Some providers, however, say that trying out different strains and dosages of a medication until patients find something that works for them isn’t so new.

“People tend to think the medical field is an exact science, and it’s not,” said Lisa Withrow, a palliative care nurse practitioner based in Bedford, N.H.

If, for example, Withrow prescribes oxycodone to a patient who has never had it before and that patient vomits, Withrow would switch the prescription to something else.

“(You’re) still going to go through that guinea-pig phase to try it and see what works,” Withrow said.

Other medications also come with warnings. If Withrow prescribes a patient a muscle relaxant, she warns them that it might make them sleepy and that they should keep it away from children.

Withrow advises her patients to read labels and trust the source of their product, whether it’s medical marijuana, which is state-regulated, or CBD, which is not state- or FDA-regulated and can be readily purchased over store counters or online.

“You need to get it from a reliable source,” she said.

But what is a reliable source of CBD?

“Huh, that’s the tough part,” Withrow said. “They have to research (it) themselves. I’ve researched some brands. I certainly can’t research them all.”

One happy CBD user — and retailer — is Rachael Hene, of Sharon. She has post-traumatic stress disorder and fibromyalgia, and finds that taking a tincture of CBD under her tongue twice a day alleviates symptoms such as anxiety and pain. It also helps her sleep. If she has flare-ups of pain in her hands, she applies a CBD salve that relieves the pain in about 15 minutes, she said.

“I can’t believe how much this helps,” Hene said.

She has found so much relief using CBD that she and her partner Andrew Switz have founded a CBD company, RopaNa. They sell their products, which include CBD from Colorado, at 30 retail locations and online.

Hene said it took some trial and error to find a dose and form of CBD that works for her, and she and Switz regularly field calls from people asking about dosage. She said they suggest people start with a low dose first.

Cannabis doesn’t work for everyone, however. Cheryl Hodgdon, of Croydon, obtained a medical marijuana card in hopes that it would give her relief from pain stemming from arthritis and Crohn’s disease.

She found the people at the dispensary helpful in sorting out what strains of marijuana might help with her pain, but found that it compromised her ability to operate her sheep farm and train dogs.

The marijuana “numbed me out to the point I couldn’t work,” she said.

She called it a “$400 boondoggle.”

Broglio and some of her colleagues recently reviewed their clinic’s records and found that more than one-quarter of the patients treated in the ambulatory palliative care clinic at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon are using either medical or recreational marijuana, and they are often doing so without medical oversight, according to an article published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine last month.

“Our patients are using cannabis,” said Broglio, one of the paper’s authors. “If we didn’t think they were using cannabis, now we really know they’re using cannabis.”

But, they said in the paper, “further research into its efficacy, side effects, and safety is needed.”

Nora Doyle-Burr can be reached at ndoyleburr@vnews.com or 603-727-3213.

Source: https://www.vnews.com/Evidence-Limited-for-Health-Care-Providers-Seeking-to-Counsel-Patients-in-Cannabis-Use-25447855

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Caroline hemp farm hopes to cash in on change in state law – Fredericksburg.com https://cannabidiolcbd.org/caroline-hemp-farm-hopes-to-cash-in-on-change-in-state-law-fredericksburg-com/ Sun, 19 May 2019 01:45:33 +0000 http://CBMijAFodHRwczovL3d3dy5mcmVkZXJpY2tzYnVyZy5jb20vbmV3cy9sb2NhbC9jYXJvbGluZS1oZW1wLWZhcm0taG9wZXMtdG8tY2FzaC1pbi1vbi1jaGFuZ2UtaW4vYXJ0aWNsZV8wZTA0OGY5Yy1kYTBmLTVhNzItODkxMi05YzQxOTJlZWI1YjMuaHRtbNIBAA A few years ago, Bill Pickett was in the mountains near Bama Yao in southwestern China, picking wild hemp seeds with a 90-year-old resident. Residents of Bama Yao—which is near where Pickett and his wife, Bixia, own a second home—have a life expectancy of over 100 years. As of 2013, […]

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A few years ago, Bill Pickett was in the mountains near Bama Yao in southwestern China, picking wild hemp seeds with a 90-year-old resident.

Residents of Bama Yao—which is near where Pickett and his wife, Bixia, own a second home—have a life expectancy of over 100 years. As of 2013, there were 81 centenarians living there.

Part of the reason for this longevity, Pickett said, is that hemp seeds are a regular part of the villagers’ diet.

“They steam them and make them into a porridge,” he said. “They say hemp originated in that region.”

Pickett suspects that the seeds he picked on that trip came from plants that were 4,000 to 5,000 years old.

“They haven’t been stepped on a lot,” he said. “There’s a purity.”

He hopes that purity comes through in the cannabis sativa plants now growing at Cool Water Farm, the Caroline County property that has been in his family for 100 years.

He developed the proprietary strains he grows—which he calls Virginia Gold and Cool Water Cherry—through open pollination of several hemp varieties, including the ancient Chinese strain, and harvested his first salable crop last August.

Virginia Hemp Commodities, the business the Picketts established, sells hemp seed and hemp plants. Pickett hopes to eventually extract CBD oil for sale.

According to the VHC website, Cool Water Farm is first licensed hemp farm in Caroline and the only source in the state for hemp seed.

“If something inspires me, I dig in and try to learn as much as I can,” Pickett said.

There is growing local and national interest in the farming of industrial hemp. The 2018 federal farm bill established a regulatory framework for the commercial production of hemp and at the end of March, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam signed legislation permitting the growing and processing of industrial hemp for commercial purposes in the state.

Until then, hemp could be grown only as part of a research program in partnership with a college or university.

Both hemp and marijuana derive from the genus of plants called cannabis, but the two plants differ in how they are cultivated and harvested. Marijuana plants are cultivated to have high levels of the chemical compound tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which produces the “high” feeling.

Hemp is cultivated to have low levels of THC and will not produce a buzz. It is an ancient crop that was important for colonial Virginians, who were required by the British to cultivate it for making canvas sails—the word “canvas” derives from “cannabis.”

Pickett said he’s been watching the progression of the hemp industry in the United States since about 2010, and in 2016, he started working with John Fike at Virginia Tech to develop his own seed. He now has separate state licenses to grow and process hemp, as well as a license for distributing the hemp seed.

Pickett said the focus of his business is in the health and medical benefits of hemp seed and in cannabinodiol, or CBD.

“CBD is the medical part,” Pickett said.

According to Brightfield Group, industry analysts for the cannabis and CBD market, CBD will be a $22 billion industry by 2020.

Studies published in the National Institute of Health database have found that cannabinoids such as CBD can help with pain relief, reducing anxiety and depression, alleviating cancer symptoms, treating seizures and lowering blood pressure, though most studies also say further research is needed.

Cool Water Farm makes a salve with 1 percent CBD oil. Pickett said he rubs it on his aches and pains and finds it soothing.

“But it could be placebo affect,” he added.

Industrial hemp can have CBD levels up to 20 percent and Pickett said Cool Water Farm’s product is “up to the higher end.”

According to federal regulations, industrial hemp plants and their derivatives—fiber and seed—cannot have THC levels higher than 0.3 percent. Pickett said the highest THC level his hemp plants measured last year was 0.2 percent at maturity.

If a crop is found to have levels of THC that are too high, it will have to be destroyed.

High THC levels can be caused by the growing environment or an overly long flowering season. They can also be caused by accidental cross-pollination with a nearby hemp crop. That’s why the Picketts also grow hemp in several other undisclosed locations around the county that are more remote than Cool Water Farm.

Cross-pollination causes problems both for hemp farmers, by making THC levels too high, and marijuana farmers, by making levels too low.

“Friends in Oregon [where growing marijuana is legal] have a lot of trouble just growing [hemp], because of all the contamination,” Pickett said. “I hope Virginia takes a little slower approach [to possibly legalizing marijuana].”

According to the Virginia Department of Agriculture, there are 15 licensed hemp production fields in Caroline, four in Stafford County, four in King George County and three in Spotsylvania County. As of last week, the state has issued 629 grower registrations and 92 processor registrations across the state.

Pickett, who also works as vice president of Hoover Treated Wood Products, said he thinks everybody sees dollar signs when they think about hemp farming.

“But they shouldn’t be focused on that,” he said. “You should go into it with the idea that you’re a farmer and you like to grow things, to plant a seed and see the product of the work.”

At Cool Water Farm, Bixia Pickett starts baby hemp plants from seed in her greenhouse. When they are old enough, she separates the males from the females.

Both male and female hemp plants go into the ground at Cool Water Farm so pollination can occur and seed will develop. At the isolated locations, the Picketts plant females only, to get flowers and buds without cross-pollination for extracting CBD.

Hemp can’t take frost, so it is planted outside once that danger has passed—though Pickett said he is working on developing a variety that can overwinter.

The soil at Cool Water Farm is a sandy loam, which hemp likes because its roots can spread out, he said. The plants get water from a drip irrigation system—they don’t like to stay wet.

“They like to take a shower and dry out,” Pickett said.

Everything is organic. Pickett said his father and grandfather, who farmed the same land before him, never used pesticides and it’s never been part of his routine, either.

Instead, he grows clover in between rows of hemp. This has the dual effect of keeping weeds down and providing nitrogen-rich fertilizer to the hemp.

Last year, some of the hemp plants grew to 14 feet tall, and six feet in diameter.

Fiber from hemp stalks can be used to make rope, textiles, clothing, shoes, food, paper, bioplastics, insulation, and biofuel.

Though it has so many potential uses, Pickett said any success he’s had didn’t come from hemp as a product, but from working hard.

“It’s profitable, but it’s hard work,” he said. “We spent $20,000 last year on just a couple of acres. I’m doing this with the mindset that I can develop something that really has some use.”

Source: https://www.fredericksburg.com/news/local/caroline-hemp-farm-hopes-to-cash-in-on-change-in/article_0e048f9c-da0f-5a72-8912-9c4192eeb5b3.html

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